Di-Ann Eisnor joins Meetup’s Board

Di-Ann-2

We’re thrilled to welcome Di-Ann Eisnor to Meetup’s Board of Directors. Di-Ann is currently VP Platform & Partnerships for crowd-sourced navigation and real-time traffic start-up, Waze. Di-Ann has a longstanding history with Meetup. She was friends with Meetup CEO Scott Heiferman in 2001, when the idea for Meetup was born. Di-Ann has been attending and organizing Meetups herself since 2004, and thinks Meetup is more important now than ever. “Meetup touches a very basic human need and desire, that’s global, that’s human. People are busier, more distant from one another now, even in the quietest corners of the world. The bringing together of humans around interests is important,” she tells us. “It’s never been a more important time for people to get together with people of like minds.”

Di-Ann believes in the mission of Meetup, and shares our excitement about Meetup’s future. “I think Meetup is poised to have the fastest growth it’s ever had,” she says. “Meetup has not even scratched the surface in terms of it’s potential growth, particularly in a mobile world, in a world where community is standard and expected and people are open to it.”

Prior to Waze, Di-Ann was Co-Founder and CEO of Platial, a widely adopted mobile and online social mapping service funded by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Ram Shriram and others. Di-Ann holds a BS in Studio Art and Business Administration from New York University.

Where do we go from here: Chaos or community? -MLK

After 11 years of building Meetup, I saw a quote that embodies my passion for what we’re doing. It also happens to be the title of MLK’s final book, so on this day, I want to share it.

“Where do we go from here: chaos or community?”
– Martin Luther King, Jr.

The words are meaningful because they represent a stark choice, one as relevant today as it was in 1967. It’s a provocative question with (I hope) an obvious answer. Let’s choose community, and let’s go build it together.

-Scott Heiferman
Co-founder, CEO of Meetup

Party Time, DIO Style

Just inside the front doors of Meetup HQ, there’s a huge sign mounted to the wall. It reads “DIO,” which stands for “Do it ourselves.” It’s safe to say we’re a pretty hands on bunch.

It was only fitting that this year, we took our end-of-the-year celebration into our own hands. We transformed Meetup HQ into a velvet ensconced Las Vegas themed palace, brought our own silly Secret Santa gifts, and even hosted the very first annual Meetup 2012 Awards.

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9/11 & Us

Fellow Meetuppers,

I don’t write to our whole community often, but this week is special because it’s the 10th anniversary of 9/11 and many people don’t know that Meetup is a 9/11 baby.

Let me tell you the Meetup story. I was living a couple miles from the Twin Towers, and I was the kind of person who thought local community doesn’t matter much if we’ve got the internet and tv. The only time I thought about my neighbors was when I hoped they wouldn’t bother me.

When the towers fell, I found myself talking to more neighbors in the days after 9/11 than ever before. People said hello to neighbors (next-door and across the city) who they’d normally ignore. People were looking after each other, helping each other, and meeting up with each other. You know, being neighborly.

A lot of people were thinking that maybe 9/11 could bring people together in a lasting way. So the idea for Meetup was born: Could we use the internet to get off the internet — and grow local communities?

We didn’t know if it would work. Most people thought it was a crazy idea — especially because terrorism is designed to make people distrust one another.

A small team came together, and we launched Meetup 9 months after 9/11.

Today, almost 10 years and 10 million Meetuppers later, it’s working. Every day, thousands of Meetups happen. Moms Meetups, Small Business Meetups, Fitness Meetups… a wild variety of 100,000 Meetup Groups with not much in common — except one thing.

Every Meetup starts with people simply saying hello to neighbors. And what often happens next is still amazing to me. They grow businesses and bands together, they teach and motivate each other, they babysit each other’s kids and find other ways to work together. They have fun and find solace together. They make friends and form powerful community. It’s powerful stuff.

It’s a wonderful revolution in local community, and it’s thanks to everyone who shows up.

Meetups aren’t about 9/11, but they may not be happening if it weren’t for 9/11.

9/11 didn’t make us too scared to go outside or talk to strangers. 9/11 didn’t rip us apart. No, we’re building new community together!!!!

The towers fell, but we rise up. And we’re just getting started with these Meetups.

Scott Heiferman (on behalf of 80 people at Meetup HQ)
Co-Founder & CEO, Meetup
New York City